Color Outside the Lines

As an oldest child I learned and loved to color inside the lines. Following the rules always made perfectly good sense to me, let’s face it you do what mom and dad say and you will not spend much time with the “board of education” if you know what I mean. For the younger generation, the “board of education” would be the equivalent of “time out” on steroids, plus it hurt.

Following the rules has its place, especially if you are in charge of a preschool class, but I have also learned that at times coloring outside the lines makes for a much more vivid and beautiful world.

Let me introduce you to a very unlikely hero. When she was in school she told her friends that the D. in her name stood for “devil” and some of them believed. She would often attend church services to poke fun at the preacher and his sermon while her friends giggled. While attending a Christian school she skipped chapel twenty-six times (at least) and as a child would often sneak out of church and go home to read Shakespeare instead of Psalms. Let’s face it at Christmas time, good old Saint Nick would put her name on the “naughty not nice” list. So who is the young lady who loved to color outside the lines? You will probably be surprised? This little “devil” grew up to become one of the great names of the Christian faith. You know her as Lottie Moon, her parents named her Charlotte Diggs Moon. Yes, little Lottie Moon who only stood 4’3’’ tall casts a shadow that still shapes the world today.

The fact that even after Lottie Moon put her faith and trust in Jesus as her Lord she continued to color outside the lines inspires me to this day. She followed hard after Christ with a passion and abandonment that rocked the world she sought to change. Her passion for adventure and her courageous spirit changed the face of China and has a lasting influence today some two hundred years after she died aboard a ship in the harbor of Kobe, Japan on her way home on Christmas Eve 1912.

So how did this little missionary cast such a big shadow? I suspect she took to heart the admonition of Jesus which states:

“Neither is new wine put into old wineskins. If it is, the skins burst and the wine is spilled and the skins are destroyed. But new wine is put into fresh wineskins, and so both are preserved.” (Matthew 9:17 ESV)

Yes, even Jesus our Lord recognized the value of coloring outside the lines.

Let me share with you a couple revolutionary changes little Lottie inspired and pursued. First, she believed the daughters of God could change the world. She believed girls could make a big difference in the world and not just in the kitchen. Lottie Moon was born into a world where too often women were seen but not heard, but God had given her a voice and she used that voice to glorify God and to preach His gospel. Yes, I used the word preach, but I have to be honest, one of the reasons Lottie loved China revolved around the freedom she found there to preach and share Jesus. From baking cookies to start conversations to going door to door talking about Jesus, Lottie could not be kept silent. I hope my girls grow up like her!

Second, Lottie realized that to enter the Kingdom of God you did not have to become an American, or take on the styles and customs of Western civilization but rather one must follow Jesus. Upon arriving in China, she began to dress like the Chinese, eat like the Chinese, and live like her friends and neighbors so they would soon come to realize Jesus came for all the nations of the world. Her methods were controversial, revolutionary, and powerful. It is little wonder after her death, the Woman’s Missionary Union named its Christmas Offering for International Missions after her.

This year when you give to the Lottie Moon offering realize you make it possible for another generation of missionaries to color outside the lines for the glory of God.

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Filed under FBC El Paso, First Look, Uncategorized

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