Leadership Quote from Teddy Roosevelt–1910

Over one hundred years ago, Teddy Roosevelt speaking at the Sorbonne in Paris said:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

As I reflected on this great insight into life and leadership the imagery of the arena gripped me. The writer of Hebrews wrote:

1 Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, 2 fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. 3 Consider him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart. (Hebrews 12:1-3 NIV)

Clearly the arena calls those who seek to follow Jesus with abandonment. Leaders know all too well the sharp sting of criticism, and the wounds of faithful friends. Leaders stumble and fall–it comes with the territory. Leadership in the long run may have more to do with the ability to keep getting up rather than never making mistakes.

Fix your eyes on Jesus and seek to live a life “without regrets.”

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